Luxury Cars Hire Germany

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Take your travel experience to another level when you use our Luxury Cars Germany hire service. Regardless of your final destination in Germany and whether your staying short term for a day or a week or even if you need to hire a Germany Luxury Cars for a longer business trip or holiday, you are sure to find our professional service second to none.

Perhaps pick up a Audi A7 Sportback in Neuschwanstein Castle to begin your journey and take in the fabulous Berlin Wall or enjoy a thrilling trip to Brandenburg Gate. For many a visit to Germany wouldn’t be complete without calling at Reichstag building in a luxurious BMW or perhaps thundering down the open road towards Museum Island in a 4×4 would be more to your taste?

If the purpose of your trip is purely recreational you may well consider visiting Cologne Cathedral which often is proven a worthwhile journey or alternatively either Heidelberg Castle or Zugspitze could be an alternative option.

In any case whether its from Dresden Frauenkirche or Sanssouci you will be sure to experience driving like never before with you book our Germany car hire service.

Here at 365 our Germany Luxury Cars rental service caters for all kinds of vehicles ranging from the exotice muscle cars, Luxury SUVs, High-End Prestige vehicles and Station Wagons through to of course Luxury Saloons or Sedans and the top class coupes.

For us the most important aspect of providing our Germany Luxury Cars hire options is to ensure your trip regardless of it’s purpose, is safe, hassle free and above all truly an experience you will want to remember for the rest of your life.

There are few other Germany Car Rental Services that can provide a driving experience the likes of which we can offer when you choose to rent a luxury car in Germany with us. Having provided cars to royalty, celebrities, business leaders and many other VIPs you can be entirely assured that our car rental services easily demonstrate why we are indeed the continental choice of car rental agency.

365 Luxury Car Hire has quickly become one of Germany’s leading car rental companies. Providing luxury rentals in over a dozen countries including France, Germany, Spain, Monaco, Italy, Portugal, UK, Turkey, Switzerland and even as far as the Middle East – UAE, Dubai and Abu Dhabi.

We provide many other Germany Car Brands than Luxury Cars so for more details please feel free to browse the rest of the site or contact us directly for our discreet and professional service.

Luxury Cars Rentals in Germany

2013 Aston Martin DB9

2014 Audi R8

2012 Bentley Continental

2013 BMW 3-series

2008 Bugatti Veyron

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2010 Ferrari California

2009 Hummer H2

2014 Jaguar XK

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2011 Lamborghini Gallardo

2012 Lamborghini Aventador

2010 Lamborghini Gallardo

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2014 Mercedes-Benz SLK-Class

2014 Porsche Cayenne

2011 Porsche 911 [997]

2010 Rolls-Royce Phantom Drophead Coupe

Germany is one of the most influential European nations culturally, and one of the world’s main economic powers. Known around the world for its precision engineering and high-tech products, it is equally admired by visitors for its old-world charm and “Gemütlichkeit” (coziness). If you have perceptions of Germany as simply homogeneous, it will surprise you with its many historical regions and local diversity.
The roots of German history and culture date back to the Germanic tribes and after that to the Holy Roman Empire. Since the early middle ages Germany started to split into hundreds of small states. It was the Napoleonic wars that started the process of unification, which ended in 1871, when a large number of previously independent German kingdoms united under Prussian leadership to form the German Empire (Deutsches Kaiserreich). This incarnation of Germany reached eastward all the way to modern day Klaipeda (Memel) in Lithuania and also encompassed the regions of Alsace and Lorraine of today’s France, a small portion of eastern Belgium (Eupen-Malmedy), a small border region in southern Denmark and over 40% of contemporary Poland. The empire ended in 1918 when Emperor (Kaiser) Wilhelm II was forced to abdicate the throne at the time of Germany’s defeat at the end of World War I (1914-1918) and was followed by the short-lived and ill fated so called Weimar Republic, which tried in vain to completely establish a liberal, democratic regime. Because the young republic was plagued with massive economic problems stemming from the war (such as hyperinflation) and disgrace for a humiliating defeat in World War I, strong anti-democratic forces took advantage of the inherent organizational problems of the Weimar Constitution and the Nazis were able to seize power in 1933.
The year 1933 witnessed the rise to power of the nationalistic and racist National Socialist German Workers’ (Nazi) Party and its Führer, Adolf Hitler. Under the Nazi dictatorship, democratic institutions were dismantled and a police state was installed. Jews, Slavs, Gypsies, handicapped people, socialists, communists, unionists and other groups not fitting into the Nazis’ vision of a Greater Germany faced persecution, and ultimately murder in concentration camps. Europe’s Jews and Gypsies were marked for total extermination. Hitler’s militaristic ambitions to create a new German Empire in Central and Eastern Europe led to war, successively, with Poland, France, Great Britain, the Soviet Union and the United States – despite initial dazzling successes, Germany was unable to withstand the attacks of the Allies and Soviets on two fronts in addition to a smaller third front to the south of the Alps in Italy.
It was “Stunde Null” or zero hour. Germany and much of Europe was destroyed. By April of 1945 Germany was in ruins with most major cities bombed to the ground. The reputation of Germany as an intellectual land of freedom and high culture (Land der Dichter und Denker) had been decimated and tarnished for decades to come. At the end of the war, by losing 25% of its territory, east of the newly Allied imposed Oder-Neisse frontier with Poland the occupied country was faced with a major refugee crisis with well over 10 million Germans flooding westward into what remained of Germany. Following the end of the war at the Potsdam conference the Allies decided the future of Germany’s borders and taking a Soviet lead stripped her of the traditional eastern Prussian lands. Therefore, German provinces east of the rivers Oder and Neisse like Silesia and Pomerania were entirely cleared of its original population by the Soviets and Polish in the largest ethnic cleansing ever – most of it an area where there had not been any sizable Polish or even Russian minorities at all. Even more refugees came with the massive numbers of ethnic Germans expelled from their ancient eastern European homelands in Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Romania and Yugoslavia.
After the devastating defeat in World War II (1939-1945), Germany was divided into four sectors, controlled by the French, British, US and Soviet forces. United Kingdom and the US decided to merge their sectors, followed by the French. Silesia, Pomerania and the southern part of East Prussia came under Polish administration according to the international agreement of the allies. With the beginning of the Cold War, the remaining central and western parts of the country were divided into an eastern part under Soviet control, and a western part which was controlled directly by the Western Allies. The western part was transformed into the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), a democratic nation with Bonn as the provisional capital city, while the Soviet-controlled zone became the communist/authoritarian Soviet style German Democratic Republic (GDR). Berlin had a special status as it was divided among the Soviets and the West, with the eastern part featuring as the capital of the GDR. The western sectors of Berlin (West Berlin), was de facto an exclave of the FRG, but formally governed by the Western Allies. On August 13, 1961 the Berlin Wall was erected as part of a heavily guarded frontier system of border fortifications. As a result, between 100 and 200 Germans trying to escape from the communist dictatorship were murdered here in the following years. Source: http://wikitravel.org/en/Germany

The term “luxury car” suggests a vehicle with higher quality equipment, better performance, more precise construction, comfort, higher design, technologically innovative modern, or features that convey an image, brand, status, or prestige, or any other ‘discretionary’ feature or combination of them. The term is also broad, highly variable and relative. It is a perceptual, conditional and subjective attribute that may be comprehended differently by different people; “what may be luxury for one may be premium for another.

In contemporary usage, the term may be applied to any vehicle type including sedan, coupe, hatchback, station wagon, and convertible body styles, as well as to minivans, crossovers, or sport utility vehicles and to any size vehicle, from small to largein any price range. Moreover, there is a convergence in the markets and a resulting confusion of luxury with high price: where there may have been a clear difference in price between luxury and others, there is no longer an absolute separation between premium and luxury, with what may be premium brands now more expensive than the equivalent so-called luxury ones

Frankfurt am Main Airport
Munich Airport
Düsseldorf International Airport
Berlin Tegel Airport
Hamburg Airport
Stuttgart Airport
Cologne Bonn Airport
Berlin Schönefeld Airport
Hannover-Langenhagen Airport
Bremen AirportNuremberg Airport
Frankfurt-Hahn Airport
Leipzig/Halle Airport
Weeze Airport
Dortmund Airport
Memmingen Airport
Dresden Airport
Baden Airpark
Bodensee Airport, Friedrichshafen
Paderborn Lippstadt Airport